ChanRobles™ Virtual Law Library | chanrobles.com™  
Main Index Law Library Philippine Laws, Statutes & Codes Latest Legal Updates Philippine Legal Resources Significant Philippine Legal Resources Worldwide Legal Resources Philippine Supreme Court Decisions United States Jurisprudence
Prof. Joselito Guianan Chan's The Labor Code of the Philippines, Annotated Labor Standards & Social Legislation Volume I of a 3-Volume Series 2019 Edition (3rd Revised Edition)
 

 
Chan Robles Virtual Law Library
 









 

 
UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT JURISPRUDENCE
 

 
PHILIPPINE SUPREME COURT JURISPRUDENCE
 

   
August-1950 Jurisprudence                 

  • G.R. No. L-2200 August 2, 1950 - RAMON N. BILBAO v. DALMACIO BILBAO, ET AL.

    087 Phil 144

  • G.R. No. L-2837 August 4, 1950 - ROSARIO S. VDA. DE LACSON, ET AL. v. ABELARDO G. DIAZ

    087 Phil 150

  • G.R. No. L-3951 August 7, 1950 - JESUS ALVARADO v. DIRECTOR OF PRISONS

    087 Phil 157

  • G.R. No. L-2397 August 9, 1950 - TOMASA QUIMSON, ET AL. v. FRANCISCO ROSETE

    087 Phil 159

  • G.R. No. L-3236 August 11, 1950 - ALFREDO CASTRO v. JOSE T. SURTIDA, ET AL.

    087 Phil 166

  • G.R. No. L-3395 August 11, 1950 - EL PUEBLO DE FILIPINAS v. FEDERICO MERCADO

    087 Phil 170

  • G.R. No. L-3734 August 14, 1950 - JOSE L. TALENS v. FELIPE GARCIA, ET AL.

    087 Phil 173

  • G.R. No. L-3224 August 15, 1950 - RURAL PROGRESS ADMINISTRATION v. EULOGIO F. DE GUZMAN, ET AL.

    087 Phil 176

  • G.R. No. L-3994 August 16, 1950 - JUANITO B. LLOBRERA v. DIRECTOR OF PRISONS

    087 Phil 179

  • G.R. No. L-3887 August 21, 1950 - FELIPE R. HIPOLITO v. CITY OF MANILA, ET AL.

    087 Phil 180

  • G.R. No. L-2724 August 24, 1950 - JOSE DE LEON, ET AL. v. ASUNCION SORIANO

    087 Phil 193

  • G.R. No. L-3251 August 24, 1950 - FELICIANO JOVER LEDESMA v. BUEN MORALES, ET AL.

    087 Phil 199

  • G.R. No. L-2939 August 29, 1950 - PLACIDO NOCEDA v. MARCOS ESCOBAR

    087 Phil 204

  • G.R. Nos. L-3274, L-3292 & L-3295 August 29, 1950 - HARRY LYONS, ET AL. v. CONRADO V. SANCHEZ

    087 Phil 209

  • G.R. No. L-3661 August 29, 1950 - SANTIAGO ICE PLANT & CO., INC. v. RAFAEL LAHOZ

    087 Phil 221

  • G.R. No. 49180 August 29, 1950 - RUFINO BUENO v. DOMINADOR B. AMBROSIO, ET AL.

    087 Phil 225

  • G.R. No. L-2671 August 30, 1950 - ANICETA IBURAN v. MAGDALENO LABES

    087 Phil 234

  • G.R. No. L-3280 August 30, 1950 - FRANCISCO LLENADO, ET AL. v. MARIA HILVANO

    087 Phil 239

  • G.R. No. L-3942 August 30, 1950 - VICTOR B. SESE v. AGUSTIN P. MONTESA, ET AL.

    087 Phil 245

  • G.R. No. L-1669 August 31, 1950 - PAZ LOPEZ DE CONSTANTINO v. ASIA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

    087 Phil 248

  • G.R. No. L-1931 August 31, 1950 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. CHUA HUY, ET AL.

    087 Phil 258

  • G.R. No. L-2042 August 31, 1950 - AURORA PANER v. NICASIO YATCO

    087 Phil 271

  • G.R. No. L-2202 August 31, 1950 - SIMEON MANDAC v. EUSTAQUIO GUMARAD, ET AL.

    087 Phil 278

  • G.R. Nos. L-3045 & L-3046 August 31, 1950 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. ANASTACIO PAZ

    087 Phil 282

  • G.R. No. L-3881 August 31, 1950 - EDUARDO DE LOS SANTOS v. GIL R. MALLARE

    087 Phil 288

  •  





     
     

    G.R. No. L-3887   August 21, 1950 - FELIPE R. HIPOLITO v. CITY OF MANILA, ET AL. <br /><br />087 Phil 180

     
    PHILIPPINE SUPREME COURT DECISIONS

    EN BANC

    [G.R. No. L-3887. August 21, 1950.]

    FELIPE R. HIPOLITO, Petitioner, v. THE CITY OF MANILA and ALEJO AQUINO, as City Engineer, Respondents.

    Felipe R. Hipolito, in his own behalf.

    City Fiscal Eugenio Angeles and Assistant Fiscal Arsenio Nañawa, for Respondents.

    SYLLABUS


    1. NATIONAL URBAN PLANNING COMMISSION; PLAN; CONSTRUCTION OF PRIVATE BUILDINGS. — The City Engineer refused to permit Hipolito to build on his lot alleging that part of it was covered by the proposed widening f the street approved by the Urban Commission. Held: The plan could not affect the construction of private buildings not subsidized in whole or in part with public funds.

    2. MANDAMUS REFUSAL OF CITY OF MANILA TO ISSUE BUILDING PERMIT WHEN NOT JUSTIFIED. — There being no allegation that petitioner had not complied with all the requisites of the Revised Ordinance of the City of Manila, and it being unquestioned that defendant’s refusal would amount to denying unlawfully to petitioner the right to beneficial use of his property, the writ of mandamus should be granted.

    3. MUNICIPAL CORPORATIONS; BUILDING PERMIT; CITY OF MANILA’S DENIAL TO ISSUE PERMIT AS AMOUNTING TO ILLEGAL EXPROPRIATION. — The City has not expropriated the strip of petitioner’s land affected by the proposal widening of the street, and inasmuch as there is no legislative authority to establish a building line, the denial of this permit would amount to the taking of private property for public use under the power of eminent domain without following the procedure prescribed for the exercise of such power.


    D E C I S I O N


    BENGZON, J.:


    This is an action to compel the respondents to issue a building permit in favor of Felipe R. Hipolito.

    The petitioner and his wife are the registered owners of a parcel of land situated at the corner of Invernes and Renaissance Streets, Santa Ana, Manila. On March 22, 1950, petitioner applied to the respondent Alejo Aquino, as City Engineer, for permission to erect a strong material residential building on his above-mentioned lot. For more than forty days, the respondent took no action. Wherefore, petitioner wrote him a letter manifesting his readiness to pay the fee and to comply with existing ordinances governing the issuance of building permits.

    On May 29, 1950, the respondent engineer answered declining to issue the permit in view of the 2d indorsement of the National Urban Planning Commission, which reads partly as follows:chanrob1es virtual 1aw library

    x       x       x


    "According to the Adopted Plan for Sta. Ana, Invernes and Renaissance Streets will be widened to the respective widths of 22-m. and 10 m. Since it is the policy of the Commission to be fair with owners of abutting properties, the widening is generally taken equally on both sides of the street, thereby affecting the proposed building of Atty. Hipolito by 5.00 m. along Invernes St, and by 1.00 m. along Rennaissance St., as shown in the attached plan. In this connection, it may be stated that Invernes St. will be an inter-neighborhood street that will connect directly the District of Sta. Ana to Pandacan. . . ."cralaw virtua1aw library

    The respondent Engineer plainly implied that Hipolito’s building should have observed the new street line indicated by the Commission.

    The petitioner, who is a lawyer, replied that the said Commission and its plans could not legally affect the construction of residential buildings, like his own, that are not subsidized in whole or in part with public funds, citing section 6 of Executive Order No. 98, s. 1946, which partly reads:jgc:chanrobles.com.ph

    "Sec. 6. Legal status of general plans. — Whenever the Commission shall have adopted a General Plan, amendment, extension or addition thereto of any urban area or any part thereof, then and thenceforth no street, park or other public way, ground place, or space; no public building or structure, including residential buildings subsidized in whole or part by public funds or assistance; . . . shall be constructed or authorized in such urban area until and unless the location and extent thereof conform to said general plan or have been submitted and approved by the Commission, . . ."cralaw virtua1aw library

    The respondent City Engineer saw differently, and refused to issue the permit, stating:jgc:chanrobles.com.ph

    "This Office is of the opinion that constructions on streets affected by the adopted plans of the N. U. P. C. will have to conform thereto unless exempted by previous municipal legislation. Notwithstanding decisions of the court of first instance to the contrary, this office will continue with this policy until the Supreme Court rules otherwise." (Emphasis ours.) .

    The defense to this petition is planted on the opinion that unless Hipolito’s building conforms to the new street line fixed by the National Urban Planning Commission, the building permit will not be issued.

    It is not claimed that the City of Manila has expropriated, or desires to expropriate, that portion of petitioner’s lot between the existing street line and the new street line adopted by the National Urban Planning Commission. No law or ordinance is cited requiring private landowners in Manila to conform to the new street line marked by the National Urban Planning Commission, except the section above quoted. And the question relates only to its interpretation.

    As we read it, that section in referring to structures to be constructed in any urban area for which the Commission has adopted a General Plan, applies only to "residential buildings subsidized in whole or in part by public funds or assistance." The residential building which petitioner intends to construct may not be so classified, because he asserts, without contradiction, that his proposed construction will be financed wholly by himself, not with public funds or assistance. Therefore, the excuse given by respondent is not valid.

    Consequently, there being no allegation that petitioner had not complied with all the requisites of the Revised Ordinance of the City of Manila, and it being unquestioned that defendants refusal would amount to denying unlawfully to petitioner the right to beneficial use of his property, the writ of mandamus should be granted. The City has not expropriated the strip of petitioner’s land affected by the proposed widening of Invernes Street, and inasmuch as there is no legislative authority to establish a building line, the denial of this permit would amount to the taking of private property for public use under the power of eminent domain without following the procedure prescribed for the exercise of such power. (See In re Opinion of the Justices, 128 A., 181; 12 Me. 501; Grove Hall Savings Bank v. Town of Dedham, 187 N. E., 182; 284 Mass., 92; Curtis v. City of Boston, 142 N. E., 95; 247 Mass., 417.) .

    Wherefore, respondents are required to issue the building permit upon payment of the fees. No costs.

    Moran, C.J., Ozaeta, Tuason, Montemayor and Reyes, JJ., concur.

    Separate Opinions


    PABLO, M., disidente:chanrob1es virtual 1aw library

    El recurrente pide a este Tribunal que ordene al ingeniero de la ciudad de Manila que expida licencia a su favor para construir un edificio de su propiedad en las calles de Invernes y Renaissance en el distrito de Sta. Ana, Manila. El ingeniero se neg6 a expedir la licencia porque el plano del edificio que desea construir no esta de acuerdo con el plan general adoptado por la National Urban Planning Commission. En dicho plan, la calle de Invernes debe tener 20 metros de ancho y 10 la calle de Renaissance, y todo edificio que se levantare a lo largo de dichas calles debe construirse a una distancia de 5 metros desde la linea antigua en la primera calle y de un metro en la segunda, para asi facilitar el futuro ensanche de las mismas. La calle de Invernes se convertira segun los planos en avenida que conectara Sta. Ana con Pandacan. Aun antes de la guerra, esta calle se habia declarado carretera nacional, y las casas construidas con posterioridad dejaron una faja de terreno de 5 metros desde los bordes de la calle actual. El ingeniero de la ciudad no quiere expedir la licencia correspondiente porque el plano del edificio no esta ajustado al plan general y no esta aprobado por la National Urban Planning Commission.

    Se arguye que no hay ninguna ordenanza que fije la nueva linea de edificacion. No es necesario que exista, porque el plan se ha adoptado de acuerdo con la orden ejecutiva No. 98, la cual tiene fuerza de ley. Dicha orden se dicto que un organismo debidamente cualificado como la National Urban Planning Commission preparase un plan general para la ciudad de Manila, un plan que coordinara, ajustara y armonizara la construccion o reconstruccion de calles, plazas y edificios para el desenvolvimiento adecuado de la ciudad, teniendo en cuenta sus presentes condiciones y futuras necesidades, la salud publica, la seguridad, orden, conveniencia, trafico, conveniente distribucion de la poblacion, adecuada provision de luz, aire y ventilacion, las medidas contra incendios y todos los medios que pueden promover el bienestar general.

    Consciente de la necesidad de reconstruir la ciudad de Manila levantandola de la desolacion y ruina en que la dejo la guerra, la legislatura aprobo el bill No. 598 de la Camara de Representantes; pero fue vetado por el presidente en primero de noviembre de 1945 porque, contrario a la constitucion, disponia que en la National Urban Planning Commission tomarian parte el presidente del comite de obras publicas del Senado y el presidente del comite de obras publicas de la Camara de Representantes. En 11 de marzo de 1946, viendo la necesidad urgente de la medida, el Presidente promulgo la orden ejecutiva No. 98, que es reproduccion, con ligeras enmiendas, del bill desaprobado y nombro a los miembros de la National Urban Planning Commission la cual preparo un plan general.

    No se discute la fuerza legal de esta orden ni se discute la vigencia del plan adoptado; pero se arguye que no hay ninguna ordenanza que oblique a los que quieren construir edificios a ajustar sus planos al plan general de la ciudad. En eso esta el error. El plan general adoptado no solamente tiene fuerza de ordenanza sino tambien fuerza de ley. Concertandonos al caso presente, el plan exige que los edificios a lo largo de la calle de Invernes deben construirse a cinco metros mas atras de la linea actual de la calle y un metro mas atras en la calle de Rennaissance. El recurrente debe construir su edificio de acuerdo con el plan general, y porque el quiere ocupar la faja de terreno de 5 metros que esta al lado de la calle de Invernes, y la faja de terreno de un metro al lado de la calle de Rennaissance, el ingeniero de la ciudad no expidio la licencia correspondiente. Y hoy acude a este Tribunal en demanda de una orden perentoria para que el ingeniero expida la licencia correspondiente. Debe denegarse su solicitud.

    Si la ciudad de Manila puede dictar una ordenanza en el mismo sentido, ¿por que no puede hacerlo el Presidente del Commonwealth por medio de una orden ejecutiva, ya que la medida aprobada por la legislatura tenia un defecto constitucional? Una fiebre por construir o reconstruir edificios reinaba como secuela de la crisis de viviendas y locales para el comercio e industria. Los habitantes de la ciudad volvian de provincias. Habia gran afluencia de gente hacia Manila. Habia necesidad de trazar nuevas calles, o de enderezar las calles tortuosas y de ensanchar las estrechas. No era conveniente convocar una sesion extraordinaria de la Legislatura para aprobar tal medida. Con la adopcion del plan general por la National Urban Planning Commission ya no es necesaria una ordenanza municipal.

    El recurrente impugna la constitucionalidad del plan general en cuanto fija una zona de cinco metros desde la calle actual hasta el edificio que se va a construir, alegando que ello equivale a privacion de propiedad sin debido proceso legal. Esa contencion es infundada, en mi opinion. Varios tribunales supremos de los estados de la Union promulgaron decisiones contradictorias; pero el Tribunal Supremo de los Estados Unidos, poniendo fin a la alegada anticonstitucionalidad de una ordenanza, ha resuelto la controversia de una manera definitiva. Ha dicho lo siguiente:jgc:chanrobles.com.ph

    "The remaining contention is that the ordinance, by compelling petitioner to set his building back from the street line of his lot, deprives him of his property without due process of law. Upon that question the decisions are divided, as they are in respect of the validity of zoning regulations generally. But, after full consideration of the conflicting decisions, we recently have held (Euclid v. Ambler Realty Co. 272 U. S. 365, 71 L. ed. 303, — A.L.R., 47 Sup. Ct. Rep. 114), that comprehensive zoning laws and ordinances, prescribing, among other things, the height of buildings to be erected (Welch v. Swazey 214 U. S. 91, 53 L. ed. 923, 29 Sup. Ct. Rep. 567) and the extent of the area to be left open for light and air and in aid of fire protection, etc., are, in their general scope, valid under the Federal Constitution. It is hard to see any controlling difference between regulations which require the lot owner to leave open areas at the sides and rear of his house and limit the extent of his use of the space above his lot and a regulation which requires him to set his building a reasonable distance back from the street. Each interferes in the same way, if not to the same extent, with the owner’s general right of dominion over his property. All rest for their justification upon the same reasons which have arisen in recent times as a result of the great increase and concentration of population in urban communities and the vast changes in the extent and complexity of the problems of modern city life. Euclid v. Ambler Realty Co. supra, p. 386. State legislatures and city councils, who deal with the situation from a practical standpoint, are better qualified than the courts to determine the necessity, character and degree of regulation which these now and perplexing conditions require; and their conclusions should not be disturbed by the courts unless clearly arbitrary and unreasonable. Zahn v. Board of Public Works, 274 U. S. 325, 71 L. ed. 1074, 47 Sup. Ct. Rep. 594, and authorities cited. (Decided May 16, 1927.)

    "The property here involved forms part of a residential district within which, it is fair to assume, permission to erect business buildings is the exception and not the rule. The members of the city council, as a basis for the ordinance, set forth in their answer that front yards afford room for lawns and trees, keep the dwellings farther from the dust, noise and fumes of the street, add to the attractiveness and comfort of a residential district, create a better home environment, and, by securing a greater distance between houses on opposite sides of the street, reduce the fire hazard; that the projection of a building beyond the front line of the adjacent dwellings cuts off light and air from them, and, by interfering with the view of street corners, constitutes a danger in the operation of automobiles. We cannot deny the existence of these grounds; indeed, they seem obvious. Other grounds, of like tendency, have been suggested. The highest court of the state, with greater familiarity with the local conditions and facts upon which the ordinance was based than we possess, has sustained its constitutionality; and that decision is entitled to the greatest respect and, in a case of this kind, should be interfered with only if in our judgment it is plainly wrong (Welch v. Swasey, supra, p. 106 [53 L. ed. 930, 29 Sup. Ct. Rep. 567]), a conclusion which, upon the record before us, it is impossible for us to reach.

    The courts, it is true, as already suggested, are in disagreement as to the validity of set back requirements. An examination discloses that one group of decisions hold that such requirements have no rational relation to the public safety, health, morale, or general welfare, and cannot be sustained as a legitimate exercise of the police power. The view of the other group is exactly to the contrary. In the Euclid case, upon a review of the decisions, we rejected the basic reasons upon which the decisions in the first group depend and accepted those upon which rests the opposite view of the other group. Nothing we think is to be gained by a similar review in respect of the specific phase of the general question which is presented here. As to that, it is enough to say that, in consonance with the principles announced in the Euclid case, and upon what, in the light of present day conditions, seems to be the better reason, we sustain the view put forward by the latter group of decisions, of which the following are representatives: Windsor v. Whitney, 95 Conn. 357, 12 A.L.R. 669, 111 Atl. 354; Wolfson v. Burden, 241 N. Y. 288, 303, 43 A.L.R. 651, 150 N. E. 120; Lincoln Trust Co. v. Williams Bldg. Corp. 229 N. Y. 313; 128 N. E. 209 (S. M. Gorieb v. Charles D. Fox, Et Al., (U. S. Supreme Court) 274 U. S. 603, 71 L. ed. 1228; 47 Sup. Ct. Rep. 675.

    Para reconstruir una ciudad es necesario una completa cooperacion entre el gobernante y sus habitantes. Sin esa cooperacion, es deficil poner a Manila a la altura de las ciudades del mundo civilizado. La ciudad no tiene muchos recursos, y su gobierno no puede de momento votar fondos para la expropiacion de terrenos para el ensanche de sus callejuelas. Necesita tiempo para rehabilitarse. Para el futuro ensanche de las actuales calles no se apodera la National Urban Planning Commission de los terrenos. Al disponer el plan general de que las casas tienen que estar a 5 metros de la linea actual de la calle de Invernes — no se apropia de la faja de 5 metros, pues la porcion esta a disposicion del dueño del terreno y puede destinarlo para jardin o patio. Cuando la ciudad ya este en mejores condiciones economicas para ensanchar la calle, entonces comprara la parte necesaria si consiente el dueño, olo adquirira por expropiacion forzosa. Mientras tanto, la faja de terreno estara a disposicion de su dueño y no la usara siquiera la ciudad.

    La calle de Sacristi antes de su ensanche era estrecha, obscura e inmunda, y se ensancho gracias a la junta municipal de entonces, y ahora, aunque es aun estrecha, ya se la puede llamar calle. La Escolta, que antiguamente era estrecha, tambien se ensancho. Pero si los miembros de la junta municipal de entonces hubieran previsto el inesperado desarrollo del comercio de Manila, tal vez hubiesen hecho esfuerzos para que la Escolta fuese mas ancha, y asi no habria necesidad de otro ensanche, o la construccion de otra calle, en lugar de ella, que responda a las nuevas exigencias del rapido desarrollo del comercio y aumento de la poblacion. El ensanche hoy de la Escolta sera ya dificil y costoso. Las calles de Dulumbayan y Salcedo, dos calles sinuosas, sucias y estrechas han desaparecido, y en su lugar se abrio la Avenida de Rizal. Pero esta avenida es aun estrecha para la actual circulacion vehicular. Los gobernantes de la ciudad no se habran imaginado entonces que para el comercio y la poblacion de Manila despues de veinte años, aquella avenida ya seria insuficiente.

    Si aquellos gobernantes hubieran tenido la vision que tuvieron los miembros de la actual National Urban Planning Commission hubieran construido una Avenida de Rizal mucho mas ancha y que se dirigiera directamente al Puente de Sta. Cruz sin trazar un semicirculo. La empresa hubiera sido facil y barata; pero en la actualidad seria demasiado costosa y tal vez fuera del alcance de la ciudad.

    El bulevar de Quezon de reciente construccion ya es estrecho e insuficiente para los numerosos vehiculos que transian por el. Las calles que estan en las cercanias del hospital general y de la Universidad de Sto. Tomas son calles que se trazaron sobre zacatales. Todo esto demuestra el rapido desenvolvimiento de la ciudad de Manila. El aumento de la poblacion es increible. Eso es la razon por que la National Urban Planning Commission con vision clara ensancha y mejora las calles actuales, endereza las mal trazadas y abre nuevas avenidas y bulevares. Las calles de la antigua Manila ya no responden a las exigencias de la vida moderna. Es necesario que los habitantes de Manila, especialmente sus propietarios, abran los ojos y vean la importancia y necesidad de sistematizar el mejoramiento de las callejuelas y callejones para responder al inusitado desarrollo de la poblacion, del comercio y de la industria.

    ¿Por que no evitar la costosa expropiacion de edificios y terrenos para abrir nuevas avenidas? ¿No son suficientes las lecciones que Manila, Paris, Barcelona y otras ciudades recibieron al construir sus modernos bulevares? Washington, la nueva New York, la nueva San Francisco, la Madrid lineal trazaron el plan antes de edificar, y no desgastaron energias, trabajo y riqueza. ¿No es eso mejor que permitir la construccion sin orden ni concierto de edificios y despues expropiar y destruir lo edificado? ¿Es que se quiere hacer negocio hasta en la construccion y destruccion?

    La National Urban Planning Commission desea hoy convertir la calle de Invernes en una avenida que conectara Sta. Ana con Pandacan. Si se realiza este proyecto, los dueños de los terrenos a lo largo de la calle tendran la satisfaccion de vivir al lado de una avenida ancha, limpia, asfaltada y con aceras en vez de una calle llena de baches. Si los dueños de los terrenos a lo largo de dicha calle fuesen mas progresivos promoverian indudablemente la construccion de esa mejora del ensanche, para tener la satisfaccion de vivir a lo largo de una calle bordeada con arboles, libre de la polvareda y salpicaduras de lodo. La ciudad no pide la cesion gratuita de terrenos; los pagara cuando este en condiciones de costear la construccion de la nueva avenida.

    Ni la National Urban Planning Commission obliga a los dueños de terrenos a que cedan a la ciudad la faja necesaria para el ensanche de la calle; solamente dispone que construyan sus edificios a 5 metros de la calle actual, dejando un espacio que podra ser utilizado para su ensanche en el futuro, y mientras no se pague su importe, el dueño lo utilizara para su propio beneficio, ya como jardin, patio o ya para algun otro fin que no sea contrario a la salud publica y la moral. Hay ahora tres casas a ambos lados del solar en que quiere levantar un edificio el recurrente y estas tres casas estan a 5 metros de la calle. Estas casas, que no estan al borde de la calle, tienen hoy el beneficio de no recibir las salpicaduras de lodo que arrojan los coches que pasan. El espacio de 5 metros de ancho las escuda del polvo y del ruido. Si el recurrente construye su edificio sobre la faja de 5 metros, obligara a la ciudad a comprar en el futuro, no solamente el terreno necesario, sino tambien el edificio. Eso es poner obstaculos a los esfuerzos de la ciudad por construir la avenida. Los dueños deben dar facilidades a la ciudad para realizar sus proyectos que, despues de todo, no son para el beneficio de los gobernantes sino de los mismos habitantes de la calle que se ha de ensanchar. Hay mas. El valor del terreno sube o baja segun su accesibilidad. Vale mas un terreno que esta al lado de una avenida asfaltada que el que esta en lo interior y se comunica con una calle por una vereda.

    Se arguye que obligar al recurrente a hacer retroceder su casa a 5 metros de la linea actual es privarle del ejercicio de su derecho de propiedad. No es cierto. El uso del derecho de propiedad no es absoluto: esta limitado por muchas circunstancias. El que vive en una ciudad debe saber que no tiene la misma libertad en el uso de su derecho que el que vive en un campo abierto y sin vecinos. Si el recurrente tuviese su solar a 5 millas de los limites de la ciudad, desde luego puede ejercer como quiera su derecho de propiedad: puede convertirla en estercolero si lo desea, cosa que no puede hacer si vive dentro de la ciudad: tiene que ajustarse a las condiciones del lugar, a los reglamentos de sanidad, del trafico, de contraincendios, de luz y ventilacion, de conveniencia publica, de sosiego, etc. Si el recurrente quisiere edificar una casa de madera de 60 pisos en su terreno, aunque no hubiese ordenanza prohibiendoselo, el ingeniero de la ciudad puede negarse a darle permiso, y no hay ningun tribunal que le obligara a expedirlo. No es necesaria la existencia de una ordenanza. El sentido comun exige que no se permita tal construccion. No solamente esta en peligro el dueño sino tambien los vecinos que estan al lado del edificio. El que vive dentro de la ciudad debe comprender que su derecho de propiedad no es ilimitado. Su derecho termina cuando comienza a estar en conflicto con el bienestar general y la salud publica.

    El recurrente sostiene que el plan general adoptado por la comision afecta solamente a edificios residenciales costeados en todo o en parte por fondos publicos, y que los edificios que se construyeren a costa de sus dueños no quedan incluidos.

    El articulo 6 de la orden ejecutiva No. 98 dispone lo siguiente:jgc:chanrobles.com.ph

    "Wherever the Commission shall have adopted a General Plan, amendment, extension or addition thereto of any urban area or any part thereof, then and thenceforth no street, park or other public way, ground, place, or space; no public building or structure, including residential buildings subsidized in whole or part by public funds or assistance; or no public utility whether publicly or privately owned, shall be constructed or authorized in such urban area until and unless the location and extent thereof conform to said general plan or have been submitted and approved by the Commission, except that the Commission may delegate its authority to approve to the District Engineer of the Engineering District in which said urban area or any part thereof is located; . . ."cralaw virtua1aw library

    La razon es sencilla: el Gobierno no esta obligado a pedir licencia del Ingeniero de la Ciudad para construir edificios publicos o edificios residenciales costeados en todo o en parte con fondos publicos. Cuando construye un dormitorio para doctores, enfermeros o estudiantes no tiene obligacion de solicitar licencia. Esta orden ejecutiva obliga hoy al Gobierno a ajustar sus proyectos de calles o edificios al plan general; en caso contrario, los proyectos serian suspendidos. Es orden expresa contra el Gobierno.

    En cambio, de acuerdo con una ordenanza de la ciudad, ninguna persona particular puede construir un edificio sin obtener previamente del Ingeniero la licencia correspondiente; que el construir sin licencia esta penado, y que al funcionario encargado de decidir si debe expedir o no la licencia es el Ingeniero. Sus resoluciones se guian por el plan general. Si el plano del edificio no se ajusta al plan general, no esta obligado a expedir la licencia. No hay necesidad de incluir, por tanto, en el articulo 6 los edificios de propiedad privada. ¿Que beneficio practico puede dar el plan general si no ha de afectar a toda clase de construcciones de propiedad privada? Seria completamente inutil, si un ciudadano pudiera construir una casa en la forma que desee. Esto es precisamente lo que ha querido impedir la orden ejecutiva.

    Opino que el Ingeniero de la Ciudad de Manila ha obrado en el caso presente de acuerdo con las disposiciones de la orden ejecutiva No. 98 y del plan general de la Ciudad de Manila, y que no priva ilegalmente al recurrente del ejercicio de su derecho de propiedad al no expedir la licencia solicitada.

    La peticion debe denegarse.

    G.R. No. L-3887   August 21, 1950 - FELIPE R. HIPOLITO v. CITY OF MANILA, ET AL. <br /><br />087 Phil 180


    Back to Home | Back to Main

     

    QUICK SEARCH

    cralaw

       

    cralaw



     
      Copyright © ChanRobles Publishing Company Disclaimer | E-mail Restrictions
    ChanRobles™ Virtual Law Library | chanrobles.com™
     
    RED