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March-1996 Jurisprudence                 

  • G.R. No. 91935 March 4, 1996 - RODOLFO QUIAMBAO v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 106043 March 4, 1996 - CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY LANDLESS RESIDENTS ASSOCIATION INC. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 109645 March 4, 1996 - ORTIGAS AND COMPANY LIMITED PARTNERSHIP v. TIRSO VELASCO, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 115365 March 4, 1996 - ESMENIO MADLOS v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 118126 March 4, 1996 - TRANS-ASIA SHIPPING LINES v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • Adm. Matter No. MTJ-94-921 March 5, 1996 - AMPARO A. LACHICA v. ROLANDO A. FLORDELIZA

  • Adm. Matter No. MTJ-94-1009 March 5, 1996 - ALBERTO NALDOZA v. JUAN LAVILLES, JR.

  • G.R. No. 111501 March 5, 1996 - PHIL. FUJI XEROX CORPORATION, ET AL. v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION

  • G.R. No. 113930 March 5, 1996 - PAUL G. ROBERTS, ET AL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 115548 March 5, 1996 - STATE INVESTMENT HOUSE INC. v. COURT OF APPEALS

  • Adm. Matter No. P-94-1039 March 6, 1996 - FE ALBANO MADRID v. RAYMUNDO RAMIREZ

  • G.R. Nos. 112858-59 March 6, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. RALPHY ALCANTARA, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 120193 March 6, 1996 - LUIS MALALUAN v. COMMISSION ON ELECTIONS, ET AL.

  • Adm. Case No. CBD-174 March 7, 1996 - GIOVANI M. IGUAL v. ROLANDO S. JAVIER

  • G.R. No. 66555 March 7, 1996 - LEONCIO MEJARES, ET AL. v. JUAN Y. REYES, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 95353-54 March 7, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. PAULINO PAT

  • G.R. No. 109390 March 7, 1996 - JGB and ASSOCIATES v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 112445 March 7, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. CARLOS V. PATROLLA, JR.

  • G.R. No. 113710 March 7, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. FERDINAND V. JUAN, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 116011 March 7, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. RHODESA B. SILAN

  • G.R. No. 117650 March 7, 1996 - SULPICIO LINES v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 120905 March 7, 1996 - RENATO U. REYES v. COMMISSION ON ELECTIONS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 95260 March 8, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. WILFREDO C. PRADO

  • G.R. No. 110983 March 8, 1996 - REYNALDO GARCIA v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • Adm. Case No. 2024 March 11, 1996 - SALVADOR T. CASTILLO v. PABLO M. TAGUINES

  • G.R. No. 108625 March 11, 1996 - ALLIANCE OF DEMOCRATIC FREE LABOR ORGANIZATION v. BIENVENIDO LAGUESMA, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 113194 March 11, 1996 - NATIONAL POWER CORPORATION v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 119381 March 11, 1996 - MARCOPPER MINING CORPORATION v. JOSE BRILLANTES

  • G.R. No. 96882 March 12, 1996 - EUTIQUIANO PAGARA, ET AL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 109800 March 12, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. WILFREDO N. BAUTISTA

  • G.R. No. 114388 March 12, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. DOMINGO TRILLES, ET AL.

  • Adm. Matter No. RTJ-94-4-156 March 13, 1996 - IN RE: FERNANDO P. AGDAMAG

  • Adm. Matter No. RTJ-96-1344 March 13, 1996 - VERONICA GONZALES v. LUCAS P. BERSAMIN

  • G.R. No. 101332 March 13, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. CLARO BERNAL

  • G.R. No. 101699 March 13, 1996 - BENJAMIN A. SANTOS v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 104088-89 March 13, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. VICENTE JAIN, ET AL

  • G.R. No. 108743 March 13, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. ARNALDO B. DONES

  • G.R. No. 112193 March 13, 1996 - JOSE E. ARUEGO, JR., ET AL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 112546 March 13, 1996 - NORTH DAVAO MINING CORPORATION, ET AL. v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 119073 March 13, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. ALBERTO DIAZ

  • G.R. No. 120223 March 13, 1996 - RAMON Y. ALBA v. DEPUTY OMBUDSMAN, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 101070 March 14, 1996 - BALAYAN COLLEGES, ET AL. v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 102062 March 14, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. CAMILO FERRER, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 104685 March 14, 1996 - SABENA BELGIAN WORLD AIRLINES v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 119706 March 14, 1996 - PHILIPPINE AIRLINES, INC. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 73592 March 15, 1996 - JOSE CUENCO BORROMEO v. INTERMEDIATE APPELLATE COURT, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 94494 March 15, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. DIONISIO C. LAPURA

  • G.R. No. 103695 March 15, 1996 - REPUBLIC OF THE PHIL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 105819 March 15, 1996 - MARILYN L. BERNARDO v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 106229-30 March 15, 1996 - LEOVIGILDO ROSALES v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 108001 March 15, 1996 - SAN MIGUEL CORPORATION, ET AL. v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 111651 March 15, 1996 - OSMALIK S. BUSTAMANTE, ET AL. v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 115106 March 15, 1996 - ROBERTO L. DEL ROSARIO v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 114988 March 18, 1996 - CATALINO BONTIA, ET AL. v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION

  • G.R. No. 117667 March 18, 1996 - INLAND TRAILWAYS v. COURT OF APPEALS

  • Adm. Matter No. 94-5-42-MTC March 20, 1996 - QUERY OF JUDGE DANILO M. TENERIFE

  • G.R. No. 102360 March 20, 1996 - ROSITA DOMINGO v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 111656 March 20, 1996 - MANUEL MANAHAN, JR. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 116665 March 20, 1996 - MELQUIADES D. AZCUNA, JR. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • Adm. Matter No. 95-1-07-RTC March 21, 1996 - JDF ANOMALY IN THE RTC OF LIGAO, ALBAY

  • Adm. Matter No. 95-10-06-SCC March 27, 1996 - IN RE: DEMASIRA M. BAUTE

  • Adm. Matter No. P-94-1071 March 28, 1996 - ELIZABETH ASUMBRADO v. FRANCISCO R. MACUNO

  • G.R. No. 104386 March 28, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. OSCAR L. LEVISTE, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 121424 March 28, 1996 - IN RE: MAURO P. MAGTIBAY v. VICENTE VINARAO

  • G.R. No. 90215 March 29, 1996 - ERNESTO ZALDARRIAGA, ET AL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 94594 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. ROMEO REDULOSA, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 96178-79 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. EDUARDO ESMAQUILAN

  • G.R. No. 97785 March 29, 1996 - PHILIPPINE COMMERCIAL INTERNATIONAL BANK v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 99259-60 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. EMILIO D. SANTOS

  • G.R. No. 103525 March 29, 1996 - MARCOPPER MINING CORPORATION v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 104296 March 29, 1996 - REPUBLIC OF THE PHIL. v. COURT OF APPEALS

  • G.R. Nos. 106083-84 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. QUINTIN T. GARRAEZ

  • G.R. No. 106600 March 29, 1996 - COSMOS BOTTLING CORPORATION v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 109312 March 29, 1996 - PLACIDO MIRANDA, ET AL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 109614-15 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. ADRONICO GREGORIO, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 112346 March 29, 1996 - EVELYN YONAHA v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 112457-58 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. ROMEO CARTUANO, JR.

  • G.R. No. 112678 March 29, 1996 - EDUARDO M . ESPEJO v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, ET AL.

  • G.R. Nos. 112708-09 March 29, 1996 - REPUBLIC OF THE PHIL. v. SANDIGANBAYAN, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 112718 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. VLADIMIR L. CANUZO

  • G.R. Nos. 113519-20 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. DANILO F. PANLILIO

  • G.R. Nos. 114263-64 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. JOHN JENN PORRAS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 115988 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. LEO V. LIAN

  • G.R. No. 116734 March 29, 1996 - PEOPLE OF THE PHIL. v. LARRY B. LAURENTE, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 116792 March 29, 1996 - BANK OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, ET AL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 117055 March 29, 1996 - SAN MIGUEL CORPORATION v. NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION

  • G.R. No. 117618 March 29, 1996 - VIRGINIA MALINAO v. LUISITO REYES, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 118509 March 29, 1996 - LIMKETKAI SONS MILLING INC. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 118870 March 29, 1996 - NERISSA Z. PEREZ v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 119193 March 29, 1996 - NEMENCIO GALVEZ v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 120715 March 29, 1996 - FERNANDO R. SAZON v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  • G.R. No. 121527 March 29, 1996 - MARCELO L. ONGSITCO, ET AL. v. COURT OF APPEALS, ET AL.

  •  




     
     

    Adm. Matter No. MTJ-94-1009   March 5, 1996 - ALBERTO NALDOZA v. JUAN LAVILLES, JR.

     
    PHILIPPINE SUPREME COURT DECISIONS

    THIRD DIVISION

    [Adm. Matter No. MTJ-94-1009. March 5, 1996.]

    ALBERTO NALDOZA, Complainant, v. JUDGE JUAN LAVILLES, JR., Respondent.

    Alberto Naldoza for in his own behalf.

    Hector P. Teodosio for Respondent.


    SYLLABUS


    1. JUDICIAL ETHICS; JUDGES; MUST CONTINUOUSLY KEEP HIMSELF ABREAST OF LEGAL AND JURISPRUDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS. — A judge owes it to the public and to the legal profession to know the factual basis of the complaint and the very law he is supposed to apply to given controversy. He is called upon to exhibit more than cursory acquaintance with the statutes and procedural rules. Party litigants will have greater faith in the administration of justice if judges are not cursorily excused of apparent deficiency in the analysis of the facts of the case and in the grasp of the legal principles. For service in the judiciary means a continuous study and research on the law from beginning to end (Roa v. Imbing, 231 SCRA 58[1994]; Wingarts v. Mejia, 242 SCRA 436 [1995]). A member of the bench must continuously keep himself abreast of legal and jurisprudential developments because the learning process in law never ceases (Wingarts v. Mejia, supra)

    2. ID.; ID.; RESPONDENT FINED FOR CONDUCTING A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF AN ELECTION-OFFENSE FALLING WITHIN COMELEC’S JURISDICTION. — The Office of the Court Administrator recommends that a fine equivalent to one month’s salary be imposed on Respondent. Considering, however, that there was no malice or evil intent in respondent’s actuations in conducting the preliminary investigation on two (2) separate complaint for vote-buying filed against a barangay chairman and in ordering the issuance of the warrants of arrest against complainant, a fine of P5,000.00 is deemed proper under the circumstances. WHEREFORE, respondent Judge Juan Lavilles, Jr. is ordered to pay a fine of Five Thousand (P5,000.00) Pesos with a stern warning that the commission of the same or similar act in the future will subject him to a more severe penalty.


    D E C I S I O N


    MELO, J.:


    The sworn letter-complaint dated May 11, 1994 of Alberto Naldoza filed through the Iloilo Regional Office of the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) charges respondent Juan R. Lavilles, Jr., presiding judge of the Municipal Trial Court of Miagao, Iloilo, with irregularity in conducting preliminary investigation, improper issuance of the warrant of arrest, and ignorance of law relative to Criminal, Cases No. 1726 and 1727, entitled "People of the Philippines v. Alberto Naldoza" for vote-buying in violation of Article XII, Section 21 of the Omnibus Election Code (BP 881).

    Complainant Alberto Naldoza, Accused in the aforestated cases was the barangay chairman of Barangay Kirayan, Tacas, Miagao, Iloilo. He ran for re-election in the May 8, 1994 elections. The spouses Generoso Flame and Lucia Flame and the spouses Marlon Piedad and Rosemarie Piedad thereafter accused complainant of vote-buying in winning the election. Accordingly, the Chief of Police of Miagao with whom the charge was lodged, filed on May 8, 1994, two separate complaints against Naldoza for vote-buying in violation of Section 21, Article XII of the Omnibus Election Code (BP 881). Both cases were assigned to respondent judge’s court and docketed thereat as Criminal Cases Nos. 1726 and 1727.

    Respondent examined the private complainants, adopting for the purpose the transcript of the question-and-answer type of examination conducted by the Chief of Police and sworn to before him by the parties.

    On May 10, 1994, respondent issued an order finding probable cause to believe complainant Naldoza committed the crime charged, and respondent thereupon issued the warrants for complainant’s arrest in the 2 criminal cases, fixing the bail at P10,000.00 in each case, for his provisional liberty. Complainant was arrested and detained.

    On May 11, 1995, respondent issued an order, directing complainant to appear before the court and to submit his counter-affidavit and those of his witnesses within 10 days from receipt of a copy of the complaints and affidavits of prosecution witnesses pursuant to Section 3(b), Rule 112 of the 1985 Rules on Criminal Procedure, as amended.

    Complainant filed a motion to quash the complaints against him and to lift the warrants of arrest on the ground that the preliminary investigation was irregularly conducted and the warrants of arrest improperly issued, thereby denying him due process. The motion was denied by respondent in his order of May 31, 1994, for the reason therein stated and referred the cases to the Commission on Elections (COMELEC) for further proceedings.

    On June 6, 1994, respondent issued another order, reconsidering his order of May 31, 1994 insofar as it referred the cases to the COMELEC. The cases were instead remanded to the Chief of Police of Miagao, Iloilo with instructions to file the same directly with the provincial prosecutor. The warrants of arrest were lifted and complainant’s release was ordered.

    In the meantime, complainant filed an administrative complaints against respondent with the Commission on Human Rights, protesting the irregularity in the conduct of preliminary investigation, the improper issuance of the warrants of arrest, and for ignorance of law.

    On the basis of the investigation and final report of Spl. Investigator IV Leonardo Nuneza, the CHR in its resolution of August 6, 1994 recommended that an administrative complaint be filed against respondent for the issuance of an unjust interlocutory order and ignorance of law which resulted in the arrest and incarceration of complainant Alberto Naldoza. The resolution was forwarded to the Office of the Administrator of this Court, for proper disposition. Further, the CHR recommended that financial assistance be afforded complainant Alberto Naldoza.

    In his comment filed on February 14, 1995, by way of compliance with the Court’s resolution of November 21, 1994, respondent denied all the charges.

    Refuting the charge that serious irregularities were committed in the conduct of the preliminary investigation for non-compliance with Section 3, Rule 112 of the Rules of Court, respondent explained that the offense of vote-buying is punishable by a penalty of imprisonment of not less than 1 year but not more than 6 years (Sec. 264, Omnibus Election Code), but pursuant to Republic Act No. 7691 the jurisdiction of municipal trial courts was expanded, such that the said offense is now within the exclusive jurisdiction of said courts. Consequently, respondent argued, Section 3, Rule 112 is no longer applicable.

    Respondent further argued that the certification of affidavits of complaining witnesses was not necessary since the complainants were brought directly before the police where their statements were taken in question-and-answer type, reduced in writing and signed under oath, and that even granting that such certification is required, non-compliance with such certification does not necessarily mean that respondent committed serious irregularities in conducting preliminary investigation.

    With regard to the complaint for improper issuance of the warrants of arrest, respondent contended that he examined the witnesses and conducted searching questions before issuing the warrants. The necessity of placing complainant under arrest is a matter addressed to judicial discretion, he contended.

    As to the charge of ignorance of the law for failure to comply with Section 4 of COMELEC Resolution No. 2695 (authorizing chiefs of police to conduct the preliminary investigation of charges for violation of the Omnibus Election Code) respondent averred that the complaint which commenced Criminal Cases Nos. 1726 and 1727 was filed on May 10, 1994, barely 45 days after the passage of the aforementioned COMELEC Resolution. It would hardly be fair, respondent continued, to expect him to be immediately aware of the existence of COMELEC Resolution No. 2695.

    On June 26, 1995, The Office of the Court Administrator submitted its memorandum pertinently stating:chanrob1es virtual 1aw library

    An examination of COMELEC Resolution No. 2695 as hereunder quoted from and cited in the COMELEC Resolution (Region VI, Iloilo City) dated August 6, 1994 in CHR Case No. 94-ILO-33 (entitled Naldoza v. Lavilles, Jr.) shows that it applies only to preliminary examination by the Chief of Police or his duly authorized PNP representative, of violations of the Omnibus Election Code and other election laws; it presupposes warrantless arrest of respondent by the arresting officer or policeman.

    Sec. 1. Preliminary examination by Chief of Police. All persons apprehended for violations of the ban on bearing, carrying and transporting of firearms and employment of security personnel and other violations of the Omnibus Election Code and other election laws shall be subject to preliminary examination by the Chief of Police or his duly authorized PNP representative.

    Sec. 2. Statements and Evidences — In the preliminary examination, the Chief of Police or his duly authorized investigator shall take the statement of the respondents require the affidavit of the arresting officer or policeman indicating therein the fact of arrest and the circumstances surrounding the arrest; confiscate the firearm, and other deadly weapons and issue the proper receipt therefor in appropriate cases and finally cause the respondent to sign an affidavit binding himself to be present at the preliminary investigation at a latter date before the prosecutor, and that failure to do so shall constitute an express waiver of his right to present evidence for his defense.

    Sec. 3. Proceedings in the preliminary examination. Any person arrested for any violation and undergoing examination must be treated humanely and with outmost respect for his constitutional rights, specially according him, although not limited to the following rights.

    (a) the right to be informed of his rights to remain silent and to have competent and independent counsel preferably of his own choice, and if he cannot afford the services of his counsel, he will be provided with one;

    (b) the right to remain silent, which cannot be waived except in writing and in the presence of counsel;

    (c) the right to have competent and independent counsel preferably of his own choice, and if he cannot afford the services of counsel, he will be provided with one, which right cannot be waived except in writing and in the presence of counsel; and

    (d) the right to be released from detention if no charges have been filed against him within twelve (12) hours from the arrest, unless they are charged under P.D. 1866.

    Sec. 4. Filing of Complaint — The Chief of Police shall file the complaint with the nearest provincial/city prosecutor for purpose of preliminary investigation at the earliest possible time for violation of the gun ban and security personnel and for other election offenses under the Omnibus Election Code and other laws, supported by the affidavits of arresting police officers and other documents and evidence.

    Considering that in this case, complainant was not under detention when the complaint against him was filed before the Chief of Police, we submit that the regular court procedure as ordained in the Rules of Court should apply and not COMELEC Resolution No. 2695. Thus, despite respondent’s admission that he was not aware of said COMELEC Resolution, his lack of knowledge and non-compliance therewith should not be taken against him as a manifestation of culpability for gross ignorance of the law.

    With respect to the other charges, a review of the pertinent provisions of law would show that pursuant to Sections 265 and 267 of the Omnibus Election Code the COMELEC has the exclusive power to conduct preliminary investigation of all election offenses punishable under the Code; and the regional trial court shall have the exclusive original jurisdiction to try and decide any criminal action or proceedings for violation of the same. The metropolitan or municipal trial court, by way of exception exercises jurisdiction only on offenses relating to failure to register or to vote. Noting that these provisions stands together with the provision that any election offense under the Code shall be punishable with imprisonment for one (1) year to six (6) years and shall not be subject to probation (Section 264, Omnibus Election Code), we submit that it is the special intention of the Code to vest upon the regional trial court jurisdiction over election cases as matter of exception to the general provisions on jurisdiction over criminal cases found under BP Bldg. 129, as amended. Consequently, the amendment of BP Blg. 129 by Republic Act No. 7691 does not vest Upon the MTC jurisdiction over criminal election offenses despite its expanded jurisdiction.

    The record on hand discloses that a criminal complaint for vote-buying was filed against complainant before the Chief of Police on the basis of which formal complaint was filed before Respondent. Respondent examined the private complainant adopting for the purpose the transcript of the question and answer type of examination earlier conducted by the Chief of Police and sworn to by the private complainants before the former. A warrant of arrest was issued by respondent and enforced by the police officers, which led to the arrest and detention of complainant. The following day, May 11, 1995, respondent issued an order requiring respondent to file his counter-affidavit pursuant to Section 3(b) Rule 112 of the 1985 Rules on Criminal Procedure, as amended. Twenty (20) days later, respondent issued an order agreeing that the cases falls under the jurisdiction of the regional trial court and thus, directed that the case be referred to the COMELEC for further proceedings. Days later, he again issued on order withdrawing his previous order and directing the referral of the case to the Chief of Police in compliance with COMELEC Resolution No. 2695. Meanwhile, complainant remained in jail.

    The Office of the Court Administrator then concluded that:chanrob1es virtual 1aw library

    It appears from the foregoing account that respondent’s actuations are tainted with irregularities beginning from the moment that he took cognizance of the case and issued warrant of arrest. Sections 265 and 268 of the Omnibus Election Code directs the COMELEC to conduct the preliminary investigation and the Regional Trial Code to hear the cases. Respondent contradicted his assertion that the cases fall under-his jurisdiction when he subsequently ordered complainant to file his counter-affidavit for preliminary investigation pursuant to Section 3(b), Rule 112 of Rules of Court. On the other hand, we believe that he was appraised of the fact that he has no authority to conduct the preliminary investigation of the cases when he ordered their referral to the COMELEC. We submit that, at this juncture, respondent should have ordered the release of complainant in deference to the findings of the COMELEC, and, in view of the fact, that the warrant of arrest was erroneously issued by a court acting without its jurisdiction.

    The findings of the Office of the Court Administrator are not without reason.

    A judge owes it to the public and to the legal profession to know the factual basis of the complaint and the very law he is supposed to apply to a given controversy. He is called upon to exhibit more than cursory acquaintance with the statutes and procedural rules. Party litigants will have greater faith in the administration of justice if judges are not cursorily excused of apparent deficiency in the analysis of the facts of the case and in the grasp of the legal principles. For service in the judiciary means a continuous study and research on the law from beginning to end (Roa v. Imbing, 231 SCRA 58[1994]; Wingarts v. Mejia, 242 SCRA 436 [1995]). A member of the bench must continuously keep himself abreast of legal and jurisprudential developments because the learning process in law never ceases (Wingarts v. Mejia, supra)

    The Office of the Court Administrator recommends that a fine equivalent to one month’s salary be imposed on Respondent. Considering, however, that there was no malice or evil intent in respondent’s actuations in conducting the preliminary investigation and in ordering the issuance of the warrants of arrest against complainant, a fine of P25,000.00 is deemed proper under the circumstances.

    WHEREFORE, respondent Judge Juan Lavilles, Jr. is ordered to pay a fine of Five Thousand (P5,000.00) Pesos with a stern warning that the commission of the same or similar act in the future will subject him to a more severe penalty.

    SO ORDERED.

    Narvasa, C.J., Davide, Jr., Francisco and Panganiban, JJ., concur.

    Adm. Matter No. MTJ-94-1009   March 5, 1996 - ALBERTO NALDOZA v. JUAN LAVILLES, JR.




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