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 ------------------------------------------------------------------------                                                   Estimated                                                     useful    Basis (or                     Property                         life       cost)                                                    (years)------------------------------------------------------------------------A (new)..........................................          4     $60,000B (new)..........................................         10      90,000C (new)..........................................          6     150,000D (used).........................................          3      30,000------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Corporation Y's qualified investment for 1972 is $220,000 determined in the following manner:
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------                                    Basis (or    Applicable   Qualified             Property                 cost)      percentage   investment------------------------------------------------------------------------A................................      $60,000      33\1/3\      $20,000B................................       90,000          100       90,000C................................      150,000      66\2/3\      100,000D................................       30,000      33\1/3\       10,000                                  --------------------------------------  Total....................................................      220,000------------------------------------------------------------------------

(c) Basis or cost. (1) The basis of any new section 38 property shall be determined in accordance with the general rules for determining the basis of property. Thus, the basis of property would generally be its cost (see section 1012), unreduced by the adjustment to basis provided by section 48(g)(1) with respect to property placed in service before January 1, 1964, and any other adjustment to basis, such as that for depreciation, and would include all items properly included by the taxpayer in the depreciable basis of the property, such as installation and freight costs. However, for purposes of determining qualified investment, the basis of new section 38 property constructed, reconstructed, or erected by the taxpayer shall not include any depreciation sustained with respect to any other property used in the construction, reconstruction, or erection of such new section 38 property. (See paragraph (b)(4) of §1.48–1.) If new section 38 property is acquired in exchange for cash and other property in a transaction described in section 1031 in which no gain or loss is recognized, the basis of the newly acquired property for purposes of determining qualified investment would be equal to the adjusted basis of the other property plus the cash paid. See §1.48–4 for the basis of property to a lessee where the lessor has elected to treat such lessee as a purchaser.

(2) The cost of any used section 38 property shall be determined in accordance with paragraph (b) of §1.48–3. However, the aggregate cost of used section 38 property which may be taken into account in any taxable year in computing qualified investment cannot exceed $50,000 (see paragraph (c) of §1.48–3).

(3) For reduction in the basis (or cost) of certain property which replaces other property which was destroyed or damaged by fire, storm, shipwreck, or other casualty, or which was stolen, see paragraph (h) of this section.

(d) Placed in service. (1) For purposes of the credit allowed by section 38, property shall be considered placed in service in the earlier of the following taxable years:

(i) The taxable year in which, under the taxpayer's depreciation practice, the period for depreciation with respect to such property begins; or

(ii) The taxable year in which the property is placed in a condition or state of readiness and availability for a specifically assigned function, whether in a trade or business, in the production of income, in a tax-exempt activity, or in a personal activity.

Thus, if property meets the conditions of subdivision (ii) of this subparagraph in a taxable year, it shall be considered placed in service in such year notwithstanding that the period for depreciation with respect to such property begins in a succeeding taxable year because, for example, under the taxpayer's depreciation practice such property is accounted for in a multiple asset account and depreciation is computed under an “averaging convention” (see §1.167(a)–10), or depreciation with respect to such property is computed under the completed contract method, the unit of production method, or the retirement method.

(2) In the case of property acquired by a taxpayer for use in his trade or business (or in the production of income), the following are examples of cases where property shall be considered in a condition or state of readiness and availability for a specifically assigned function:

(i) Parts are acquired and set aside during the taxable year for use as replacements for a particular machine (or machines) in order to avoid operational time loss.

(ii) Operational farm equipment is acquired during the taxable year and it is not practicable to use such equipment for its specifically assigned function in the taxpayer's business of farming until the following year.

(iii) Equipment is acquired for a specifically assigned function and is operational but is undergoing testing to eliminate any defects.

(iv) Reforestation expenditures (as defined in §1.194–3(c)) are incurred during the taxable year in connection with qualified timber property (as defined in §1.194–3(a)).

However, fruit-bearing trees and vines shall not be considered in a condition or state of readiness and availability for a specifically assigned function until they have reached an income-producing stage. Moreover, materials and parts acquired to be used in the construction of an item of equipment shall not be considered in a condition or state of readiness and availability for a specifically assigned function.

(3) Notwithstanding subparagraph (1) of this paragraph, property with respect to which an election is made under §1.48–4 to treat the lessee as having purchased such property shall be considered placed in service by the lessor in the taxable year in which possession is transferred to such lessee.

(4)(i) The credit allowed by section 38 with respect to any property shall be allowed only for the first taxable year in which such property is placed in service by the taxpayer. The determination of whether property is section 38 property in the hands of the taxpayer shall be made with respect to such first taxable year. Thus, if a taxpayer places property in service in a taxable year and such property does not qualify as section 38 property (or only a portion of such property qualifies as section 38 property) in such year, no credit (or a credit only as to the portion which qualifies in such year) shall be allowed to the taxpayer with respect to such property notwithstanding that such property (or a greater portion of such property) qualifies as section 38 property in a subsequent taxable year. For example, if a taxpayer places property in service in 1963 and uses the property entirely for personal purposes in such year, but in 1964 begins using the property in a trade or business, no credit is allowable to the taxpayer under section 38 with respect to such property. See §1.48–1 for the definition of section 38 property.

(ii) Notwithstanding subdivision (i) of this subparagraph, if, for the first taxable year in which property is placed in service by the taxpayer, the property qualifies as section 38 property but the basis of the property does not reflect its full cost for the reason that the total amount to be paid or incurred by the taxpayer for the property is indeterminate, a credit shall be allowed to the taxpayer for such first taxable year with respect to so much of the cost as is reflected in the basis of the property as of the close of such year, and an additional credit shall be allowed to the taxpayer for any subsequent taxable year with respect to the additional cost paid or incurred during such year and reflected in the basis of the property as of the close of such year. The estimated useful life used in computing each additional credit with respect to the property shall be the same as the estimated useful life used in computing the credit for the first taxable year in which the property was placed in service by the taxpayer. Assume, for example, that in 1964 X Corporation, a utility company which makes its return on the basis of a calendar year, enters into an agreement with Y Corporation, a builder, to construct certain utility facilities for a housing development built by Y. Assume further that part of the funds for the construction of the utility facilities is advanced by Y under a contract providing that X will repay the advances over a 10-year period in accordance with an agreed formula, after which no further amounts will be repayable by X even though the full amount advanced by Y has not been repaid. Assuming that the utility facilities are placed in service in 1964 and qualify as section 38 property, X is allowed a credit for 1964 with respect to its basis in the utility facilities at the close of 1964. For each succeeding taxable year X is allowed an additional credit with respect to the increase in the basis of the utility facilities resulting from the repayments to Y during such year.

(e) Estimated useful life—(1)(i) In general. With respect to assets placed in service by the taxpayer during any taxable year, for the purpose of computing qualified investment the estimated useful lives assigned to all assets which fall within a particular guideline class (within the meaning of Revenue Procedure 62–21) may be determined, at the taxpayer's option, under either subparagraph (2) or (3) of this paragraph. Thus, the taxpayer may assign estimated useful lives to all the assets falling in one guideline class in accordance with subparagraph (2) of this paragraph, and may assign estimated useful lives to all the assets falling within another guideline class in accordance with subparagraph (3) of this paragraph. See subparagraphs (4) and (5) of this paragraph for determination of estimated useful lives of assets not subject to subparagraph (2) or (3) of this paragraph.

(ii) Except as provided in subparagraph (7), this paragraph shall not apply to property described in section 50.

(2) Class life system. The taxpayer may assign to each asset falling within a guideline class, which is placed in service during the taxable year, the class life of the taxpayer for the guideline class for such year as determined under section 4, part II of Revenue Procedure 62–21. The preceding sentence may be applied to the assets falling within a guideline class irrespective of whether the taxpayer uses single asset accounts or multiple asset accounts in computing depreciation with respect to such assets and irrespective of whether the taxpayer chooses to have his depreciation allowance with respect to such assets examined under the rules provided in Revenue Procedure 62–21.

(3) Individual useful life system. (i) The taxpayer may assign an individual estimated useful life to each asset falling within a guideline class which is placed in service during the taxable year. With respect to the assets falling within the guideline class which are placed in single asset accounts for purposes of computing depreciation, the estimated useful life used for each asset for that purpose shall be used in determining qualified investment. With respect to the assets falling within the guideline class which are placed in multiple asset accounts (including a guideline class account described in Revenue Procedure 62–21) for which a group, classified, or composite rate is used in computing depreciation (or in single asset accounts for which an average life rate is used), the determination of estimated useful life for each asset in the account shall be made individually on the best estimate obtainable on the basis of all the facts and circumstances. The individual estimated useful lives used for all the assets placed in a multiple asset account, when viewed together, must be consistent with the group, classified, or composite life used for the account for purposes of computing depreciation.

(ii) In determining the individual estimated useful lives of assets similar in kind contained in a multiple asset account (or in single asset accounts for which an average life rate is used), the taxpayer may (a) assign to each of such assets the average useful life of such assets used for purposes of computing depreciation, or (b) assign separate lives to such assets based on the estimated range of years taken into consideration in establishing the average useful life. Thus, for example, if a taxpayer places nine similar trucks with an average estimated useful life of 7 years, based on an estimated range of 6 to 8 years (two trucks with a useful life of 6 years, five trucks with a useful life of 7 years, and two trucks with a useful life of 8 years), in a multiple asset account for which a group rate is used in computing depreciation, he may either assign a useful life of 6 years to two of the trucks, 7 years to five of the trucks, and 8 years to two of the trucks, or he may assign the average useful life of the trucks (7 years) to each of the nine trucks. Likewise, if a taxpayer places 100 similar telephone poles with an average useful life of 28 years, based on an estimated range of 3 to 40 years (two with a useful life of less than 4 years, three with a useful life of 4 to 6 years, four with a useful life of 6 to 8 years, and 91 with a useful life of more than 8 years), in a multiple asset account for which a group rate is used in computing depreciation, he may either assign useful lives corresponding to the estimated range of years of the poles (i.e., a useful life of less than 4 years to two of the poles, etc.), or he may assign the average useful life of the poles (28 years) to each of the poles.

(iii) [Reserved]

(iv) For purposes of subdivision (ii) of this subparagraph, assets (other than “mass assets”) shall not be considered as “similar in kind” in respect of other assets unless all such assets are substantially of the same value, nor shall used section 38 property be considered as “similar in kind” to new section 38 property.

(4) Useful life of property subject to amortization—(i) In general. In the case of property with respect to which amortization in lieu of depreciation is allowable, the term over which amortization deductions are taken shall be considered as the estimated useful life of such property.

(ii) Qualified timber property. In the case of qualified timber property (within the meaning of section 194(c)(1)), the normal growing period of such property shall be considered its estimated useful life.

(5) Useful life of property subject to certain methods of depreciation. If a taxpayer is using a method of depreciation, such as the unit of production or retirement method, which does not measure the useful life of the property in terms of years, he must estimate such useful life in years in order to compute his qualified investment.

(6) Record requirements. The taxpayer shall maintain sufficient records to determine whether section 47 (relating to certain dispositions, etc., of section 38 property) applies with respect to any asset.

(7) Section 50 property. (i) The provisions of this subparagraph and subparagraphs (4) and (6) of this paragraph shall apply to property which is described in section 50.

(ii) The estimated useful life of property for purposes of computing qualified investment shall be the useful life used or to be used by the taxpayer in computing the allowance for depreciation with respect to such property under section 167 for the taxable year in which the property is placed in service. Thus, if property is placed in service by a taxpayer in a taxable year but the period for depreciation with respect to such property does not begin until a succeeding taxable year (see paragraph (d)(1) of this section), the estimated useful life for purposes of computing qualified investment must be the estimated useful life that the taxpayer uses in computing the allowance for depreciation. See subdivision (iv) of this subparagraph for rules for determining the estimated useful life of property with respect to which the allowance for depreciation under section 167 is computed under the unit of production method, the income-forecast method, or any other method which does not measure the useful life of the property in terms of years.

(iii)(a) The estimated useful life of any section 38 property to which an election under section 167(m) applies shall be the asset depreciation period selected for such property under §1.167(a)–11(b)(4), whether or not such property constitutes mass assets (as defined in §1.47–1(e)(4)).

(b) The estimated useful life of any section 38 property to which an election under section 167(m) does not apply and which is placed in a multiple asset account for which a group, classified, or composite rate is used in computing depreciation (or in single asset accounts for which an average life rate is used) shall be determined individually for each asset on the best estimate obtainable on the basis of all the facts and circumstances. The individual estimated useful life for each asset placed in a multiple asset account (including a mass asset account) must be the same as the useful life of such asset used in determining the group, classified, or composite life for the account for purposes of computing depreciation. The individual estimated useful lives of assets similar in kind may be determined in accordance with subdivisions (ii) and (iv) of subparagraph (3) of this paragraph. In the case of mass assets, subdivision (iii) of subparagraph (3) of this paragraph shall apply.

(f) Partnerships—(1) In general. In the case of a partnership, each partner shall take into account separately, for his taxable year with or within which the partnership taxable year ends, his share of the basis of partnership new section 38 property and his share of the cost of partnership used section 38 property placed in service by the partnership during such partnership taxable year. Each partner shall be treated as the taxpayer with respect to his share of the basis of partnership new section 38 property and his share of the cost of partnership used section 38 property. The estimated useful life to each partner of such property shall be deemed to be the estimated useful life of the property in the hands of the partnership. Partnership section 38 property shall not, by reason of each partner taking his share of the basis or cost into account, lose its character as either new section 38 property or used section 38 property, as the case may be. For computation of each partner's qualified investment for the energy credit for a qualified intercity bus, see §1.48–9(q)(9)(iv).

(2) Determination of partner's share. (i) Each partner's share of the basis (or cost) of any section 38 property shall be determined in accordance with the ratio in which the partners divide the general profits of the partnership (that is, the taxable income of the partnership as described in section 702(a)(9)) regardless of whether the partnership has a profit or a loss for its taxable year during which the section 38 property is placed in service. However, if the ratio in which the partners divide the general profits of the partnership changes during the taxable year of the partnership, the ratio effective for the date on which the property is placed in service shall apply.

(ii) Notwithstanding subdivision (i) of this subparagraph, if all related items of income, gain, loss, and deduction with respect to any item of partnership section 38 property are specially allocated in the same manner and if such special allocation is recognized under section 704 (a) and (b) and paragraph (b) of §1.704–1, then each partner's share of the basis of such item of new section 38 property or the cost of such item of used section 38 property shall be determined by reference to such special allocation effective for the date on which the property is placed in service.

(iii) Notwithstanding subdivisions (i) and (ii) of this subparagraph, if with respect to a partnership's taxable year the conditions set forth in (a) through (c) of this subdivision are satisfied with respect to a partner, then such partner shall not take into account the basis (or cost) of any section 38 property placed in service by the partnership during such taxable year. The conditions referred to in the preceding sentence are:

(a) Such partner's interest in the general profits of the partnership during the taxable year is 5 percent or less;

(b) Under the partnership agreement, such partner will retire from the partnership during the taxable year or within 7 years after the end of such year; and

(c) The partnership agreement provides that the basis (or cost) of section 38 property placed in service by the partnership during the taxable year shall not be taken into account by a partner described in (a) and (b) of this subdivision.

Any basis (or cost) of section 38 property which is not taken into account by a partner because of the provisions of this subdivision shall be taken into account by the other partners in accordance with subdivision (i) of this subparagraph.

(3) Examples. This paragraph may be illustrated by the following examples:

Example 1.  Partnership ABCD acquires and places in service on January 1, 1962, an item of new section 38 property, and acquires and places in service on September 1, 1962, another item of new section 38 property. The ABCD partnership and each of its partners reports income on the basis of the calendar year. Partners A, B, C, and D share partnership profits equally. Each partner's share of the basis of each new partnership section 38 property is 25 percent.

Example 2.  Assume the same facts as in Example 1 and the following additional facts: A dies on June 30, 1962, and B purchases A's interest as of such date. Each partner's share of the profits from January 1 to June 30 is 25 percent. From July 1 to December 31, B's share of the profits is 50 percent, and C and D's share of the profits is 25 percent each. For A's last taxable year (January 1 to June 30, 1962), A shall take into account 25 percent of the basis of the section 38 property placed in service on January 1. B shall take into account 25 percent of the basis of the section 38 property placed in service on January 1 and 50 percent of the basis of the section 38 property placed in service on September 1, C and D shall each take into account 25 percent of the basis of each new section 38 property placed in service by the partnership in 1962.

Example 3.  Partnership MR is engaged in the business of renting soda fountain equipment and icemakers to restaurants. The partnership makes no elections under §1.48–4 to treat its lessees as having purchased such property. Under the terms of the partnership agreement, the income, gain or loss on disposition, depreciation, and other deductions attributable to the icemakers are specially allocated 70 percent to partner M and 30 percent to partner R. In all other respects M and R share profits and losses equally. If the special allocation with respect to the icemakers is recognized under section 704 (a) and (b) and paragraph (b) of §1.704–1, the basis (or cost) of the icemakers which qualify as partnership section 38 property shall be taken into account 70 percent by M and 30 percent by R. The basis (or cost) of partnership section 38 property not subject to the special allocation shall be taken into account equally by M and R.

Example 4.  Assume the same facts as in Example 3 and the following additional facts: During November 1962, the partnership, which reports its income on the basis of a fiscal year ending May 31, acquires and places in service two items which qualify as new section 38 property, an icemaker and a soda fountain. The icemaker has an estimated useful life of 8 years to the partnership and a basis of $1,000. The soda fountain has an estimated useful life of 6 years to the partnership and a basis of $600. Partner M also owns and operates a business as a sole proprietorship and reports income on the calendar year basis. During 1963, M acquires and places in service in his sole proprietorship a machine which qualifies as new section 38 property. This machine has an estimated useful life of 4 years and a basis of $300. M owns no interest in any other partnerships, electing small business corporations, estates, or trusts. M's total qualified investment for 1963 is $1,000, computed as follows:

 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------                                     Estimated                     M's share of     Applicable       Qualified            Property                useful life        Basis           basis        percentage      investment----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------         Partnership MRIcemaker........................               8          $1,000            $700             100            $700Soda fountain...................               6             600             300         66\2/3\             200       Sole proprietorshipMachine.........................               4             300  ..............         33\1/3\             100                                 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------    Total.......................................................................................           1,000----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(g) Public utility property—(1) In general—(i) Scope of paragraph. This paragraph only applies to property described in section 50. For rules relating to public utility property not described in section 50, see 26 CFR part 1, §1.46–3(g) (as revised April 1, 1977). This paragraph does not reflect amendments to section 46(c) made after enactment of the Revenue Act of 1971.

(ii) Amount of qualified investment. A taxpayer's qualified investment in section 38 property that is public utility property is 4/7 of the amount otherwise determined under this section.

(2) Meaning and uses of certain terms. For purposes of this paragraph—

(i) Public utility property. “Public utility property” is property used by a taxpayer predominantly in a trade or business that is a public utility activity and property that is nonregulated communication property.

(ii) Public utility activity. A “public utility activity” is any activity in which the goods or services described in section 46(c)(3)(B) (i), (ii), or (iii) are furnished or sold at regulated rates. If property is used by a taxpayer both in a public utility activity and in another activity, the characterization of such property is based on the predominant use of such property during the taxable year in which it is placed in service.

(iii) Regulated rates. A taxpayer's rates are “regulated” if they are established or approved on a rate-of-return basis. Rates regulated on a rate-of-return basis are an authorization to collect revenues that cover the taxpayer's cost of providing goods or services, including a fair return on the taxpayer's investment in providing such goods or services, where the taxpayer's costs and investment are determined by use of a uniform system of accounts prescribed by the regulatory body. A taxpayer's rates are not “regulated” if they are established or approved on the basis of maintaining competition within an industry, insuring adequate service to customers of an industry, or charging “reasonable” rates within an industry since the taxpayer is not authorized to collect revenues based on the taxpayer's cost of providing goods or services. Rates are considered to have been “established or approved” if a schedule of rates is filed with a regulatory body that has the power to approve such rates, even though the regulatory body takes no action on the filed schedule or generally leaves undisturbed rates filed by the taxpayer.

(iv) Nonregulated communication property. “Nonregulated communication property” is property that is clearly the same type of property (and is used by the taxpayer predominantly for the same type of communication purposes) as communication property, but it is used by the taxpayer predominantly in a trade or business that is not a public utility activity. For purposes of this paragraph (g)(2)(iv), of this section, communication property is property ordinarily used for communication purposes by persons who provide regulated telephone or microwave communication services described in section 46(c)(3)(B)(iii). The determination of whether property is clearly of this same type and is used predominantly for these same communication purposes as communication property is made on the basis of the facts and circumstances of each particular case, including the current state of technology in the communications industry and the range and type of services permitted or required to be provided by the regulated telephone and microwave communication industry. As of 1978, wires or cables used predominantly to distribute to subscribers the signals of one or more television broadcast stations or cablecast stations (such as in a CATV system) are not used for the same type of communication purposes as communication property. Communication property includes microwave transmission equipment, private communication equipment (other than land mobile radio equipment for which the operator must obtain a license from the Federal Communications Commission), private switchboard (PBX) equipment, communications terminal equipment connected to telephone networks, data transmission equipment, and communications satellites. Communication property does not include (as of 1978) computer terminals or facsimile reproduction equipment that is connected to telephone lines to transmit data. It also does not include office furniture stands for communication property, tools, repair vehicles, and similar property, even if such property is exclusively used in providing regulated telephone or microwave communication services.

(3) Leased property. Public utility property includes property which is leased to others by a taxpayer where the leasing of such property is part of the lessor's public utility activity. Thus, such leased property is public utility property even though the lessee uses such property in an activity which is not a public utility activity, and whether or not the lessor of such property makes a valid election under §1.48–4 to treat the lessee as having purchased such property for purposes of the credit allowed by section 38. Property leased by a lessor, where the leasing is not part of a public utility activity, to a lessee who uses such property predominantly in a public utility activity is public utility property for purposes of computing the lessor's or lessee's qualified investment with respect to such property.

(4) Property used in both the production or transmission of gas and the local distribution of gas. (i) With respect to properties of a taxpayer engaged in both the production or transmission of gas and the local distribution of gas, section 38 property shall be considered as used predominantly in the trade or business of the furnishing or sale of gas through a local distribution system if expenditures for such property are chargeable to any of the following accounts under either the uniform system of accounts prescribed for natural gas companies (class A and class B) by the Federal Power Commission, effective January 1, 1961, or the uniform system of accounts for class A and B gas utilities adopted in 1958 by the National Association of Railroad and Utility Commissioners (or would be chargeable to any of the following accounts if the taxpayer used either of such systems):

(a) Accounts 360 through 363, inclusive (Local Storage Plant), or

(b) Accounts 374 through 387, inclusive (Distribution Plant).

(ii) If expenditures for section 38 property are chargeable (or would be chargeable) to any of the following accounts under either of the systems named in subdivision (i) of this subparagraph, the determination of whether or not such property is used predominantly in the trade or business of the furnishing or sale of gas through a local distribution system shall be made under all the facts and circumstances relating to the actual use of such property in the year such property is placed in service:

(a) Accounts 304 through 320, inclusive (Manufactured Gas Production Plant), or

(b) Accounts 389 through 399, inclusive (General Plant).

For example, if an office machine is used 55 percent of the time for billing customers of the taxpayer's local distribution system in the year in which it is placed in service, such office machine shall be considered as used predominantly in the trade or business of the furnishing or sale of gas through a local distribution system.

(5) Certain submarine cable property. In the case of any interest in a submarine cable circuit which is property described in section 50 used to furnish telegraph service between the United States and a point outside the United States of a taxpayer engaged in furnishing international telegraph service (if the rates for such furnishing have been established or approved by a governmental unit, agency, instrumentality, commission, or similar body described in subparagraph (2) of this paragraph), the qualified investment shall not exceed the qualified investment attributable to so much of the interest of the taxpayer in the circuit as does not exceed 50 percent of all interests in the circuit.

(h) Certain replacement property. (1)(i) If section 38 property is placed in service by the taxpayer to replace property (whether or not section 38 property) similar or related in service or use, which was destroyed or damaged before August 16, 1971, by fire, storm, shipwreck, or other casualty, or was stolen before such date, then for purposes of paragraph (a) of this section the basis (or cost) of the replacement section 38 property otherwise determined under paragraph (c) of this section shall be reduced by an amount equal to the lesser of—

(a) The amount of money, or the fair market value of other property, received as compensation, by insurance or otherwise, for the property which was destroyed, damaged, or stolen, or

(b) The adjusted basis of such destroyed, damaged, or stolen property (immediately before such destruction, damage, or theft).

(ii) For purposes of subdivision (i) of this subparagraph—

(a) Section 38 property placed in service after the due date (including extensions of time thereof) for filing the taxpayer's income tax return for the taxable year in which the other property was destroyed, damaged, or stolen shall not be considered as replacement section 38 property, and

(b) If the property which is destroyed, damaged, or stolen, is leased property, no other leased property shall be considered as replacement property with respect to the property destroyed, damaged, or stolen, in any case in which the lessor makes or made an election under section 48(d) (relating to election with respect to certain leased property) with respect to either the property destroyed, damaged, or stolen, the other leased property, or both.

(2) Subparagraph (1) of this paragraph shall not apply to replacement property if the reduction, under such subparagraph (1), in the basis (or cost) of such replacement property is less than the excess of—

(i) The qualified investment with respect to the destroyed, damaged, or stolen property, over

(ii) The recomputed qualified investment with respect to such property (determined under the principles of paragraph (a) of §1.47–1).

(3) This paragraph may be illustrated by the following examples:

Example 1.  (i) A acquired and placed in service on January 1, 1962, machine No. 1, which qualified as section 38 property, with a basis of $30,000 and an estimated useful life of 6 years. The amount of qualified investment with respect to such machine was $20,000. On January 2, 1963, machine No. 1 is completely destroyed by fire. On January 1, 1963, the adjusted basis of such machine in A's hands is $24,500. On November 1, 1963, A receives $23,000 in insurance proceeds as compensation for the destroyed machine, and on December 15, 1963, A acquires and places in service machine No. 2, which qualifies as section 38 property, with a basis of $41,000 and an estimated useful life of 6 years to replace machine No. 1.

(ii) Under subparagraph (1) of this paragraph, the $41,000 basis of machine No. 2 is reduced, for purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, by $23,000 (that is, the $23,000 insurance proceeds since such amount is less than the $24,500 adjusted basis of machine No. 1 immediately before it was destroyed) to $18,000 since such reduction (that is, $23,000) is greater than the $20,000 reduction in qualified investment which would be made if paragraph (a) of §1.47–1 were to apply to machine No. 1 ($20,000 qualified investment less zero recomputed qualified investment).

Example 2.  (i) The facts are the same as in Example 1 except that on November 1, 1963, A receives only $19,000 in insurance proceeds as compensation for the destroyed machine.

(ii) The $41,000 basis of machine No. 2 is not reduced, for purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, under this paragraph since the $19,000 reduction which would have been made under this paragraph had it applied (that is, the $19,000 insurance proceeds since such amount is less than the $24,500 adjusted basis of machine No. 1 immediately before it was destroyed) is less than the $20,000 reduction in qualified investment which is made since paragraph (a) of §1.47–1 applies to machine No. 1 ($20,000 qualified investment less zero recomputed qualified investment).

(Secs. 194 (94 Stat. 1989; 26 U.S.C. 194) and 7805 (68A Stat. 917, 26 U.S.C. 7805) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954; secs. 38(b) (76 Stat. 963, 26 U.S.C. 38(b)), 48(l)(16) (94 Stat. 264, 26 U.S.C. 48(l)(16)), and 7805 (68A Stat. 917, 26 U.S.C. 7805)

[T.D. 6731, 29 FR 6068, May 8, 1964, as amended by T.D. 6931, 32 FR 14026, Oct. 10, 1967; T.D. 7203, 37 FR 17125, Aug. 25, 1972; T.D. 7602, 44 FR 17667, Mar. 23, 1979; T.D. 7927, 48 FR 55849, Dec. 16, 1983; T.D. 7982, 49 FR 39541, Oct. 9, 1984; T.D. 8183, 53 FR 6618, Mar. 2, 1988; T.D. 8474, 58 FR 25557, Apr. 27, 1993]

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